Annoyed With Christmas Music?

by | Community Blog | 0 comments

It’s that time of year once again. Time for:

  • Countless Christmas parties
  • Ugly sweaters
  • Family dinners, and
  • Christmas music everywhere

Two weeks ago I walked into a store while running errands. This particular store is a national brand and is not a Christian company. As I waited for an employee, I noticed Christmas music playing on the store radio. The song playing was “Hark The Herald Angels Sing” by Pentatonix.

It’s a great arrangement of a classic Christmas song. The only people who don’t like it are the ones without a pulse.

The holiday seaon brings a lot of stress and disagreement, and Christmas music is a polarizing topic. I’m always surprised to see those who hate Christmas music on my social media feeds. Many are vocal in their annoyance by it, including pastors.

As a pastor, you are responsible for leading and shepherding your church. Part of that role involves pointing out things others miss. And you have that responsibility with Christmas music.

Standing in the store listening to “Hark The Herald Angels Sing,” I was reminded of something: we as Christians ought to seize the opportunity every year when we hear Christmas music. Non-Christians are literally singing the gospel and listening to it everywhere they go, and no one complains.

In fact, Christmas is the only time when even atheists will sing the gospel story (like James Taylor’s version of Go Tell It On The Mountain).

 

 

As pastors, you can thank God for the abundance of Christmas music and lead your people to do the same. When you’re standing in line at the store or driving in the car, you will hear a wide range of people singing traditional Christmas tunes that herald the gospel.

Yet the likely have no idea the power of the truths they sing. As a pastor, show your congregation the opportunity they have this season. Show them the power of the gospel in these familiar songs.

This year, don’t proclaim your annoyance with Christmas music. Instead, lead your people to love it. Lead them to use it as a way to explain the gospel to those who are already singing it.